OpenD6 Fantasy Character Basics

This section covers three methods of character creation and provides an overview of the attributes and skills available to characters. If you've made a character already, skim the section, adjusting your character if necessary.

Attributes

Each character has seven attributes, which measure basic physical and mental abilities that are common to every living creature (and some nonliving things), no matter what universe or dimension they exist in.

Agility: An indication of balance, limberness, quickness, and fullbody motor abilities.

Coordination: A quantification of hand-eye coordination and fine motor abilities.

Physique: An estimation of physical power and ability to resist damage.

Intellect: A measure of strength of memory and ability to learn.

Acumen: Your character's mental quickness, creativity, and attention to detail.

Charisma: A gauge of emotional strength, physical attractiveness, and personality.

Extranormal: An assessment of your character's extraordinary

abilities, which could include magic, miracles, or other extranormal talents. It is often listed by its type, rather than by the term "Extranormal. "

Most characters begin with a score of 0D, since people with such abilities are extremely rare. Those who have an Extranormal attribute must decide how it's manifested. Characters almost never have more than one Extranormal attribute. Magic and Miracles are two Extranormal attributes described in these rules.

When you put dice in an attribute, you can either put whole dice in each attribute, or you can give each a mixture of whole dice and pips. Each die equals three pips.

Example: You've distributed most of your attribute dice, but you have four dice left to put in Intellect and Charisma. You could put 1D in Intellect and 3D in Charisma, or 2D+1 in Intellect and 1D+2 in Charisma, or some similar combination.

Extranormal is the only attribute in which a Human character may have no dice; there is no maximum that a Human character may have in this attribute. No Human character may have less than 1D or more than 5D in any other attribute. Other races may have other minimums and maximums, which may be represented by the Increased Attribute Special Ability or the Hindrance Disadvantage, which are either listed with the race description or specified by the gamemaster. See the "Character Options" section for details on Disadvantages and Special Abilities, and the "Non-Human Races" section for some other fantasy race examples.

Skills

Skills are more specific applications of an attribute. For example, the skill dodge is a more specific use of your character's Agility. Characters learn them through instruction or experience.

Skills are areas of expertise that are not necessarily common to every living creature. Some creatures simply don't have the capacity to learn certain skills.

All skills beneath a given attribute begin at that attribute's die code. To highlight skills in which the character has trained or has some experience, add pips or dice to the base attribute value. As with attributes, when creating your character you can either put whole dice in each skill, or you can give each a mixture of whole dice and pips. Remember that each die equals three pips.

Example: You've chosen your attribute scores, including putting 2D+1 in Intellect. If you wanted her to be a little better in the speaking skill, you could add one pip to the base attribute to get a speaking skill score of 2D+2. If you decided to add two pips to the base attribute, the speaking score becomes 3D.

You can also specialize in skills. Specializations reflect a greater familiarity in a particular area covered by a base skill. One skill die equals three specialization dice. Of course, one specialization die still equals three pips.

You don't need to have any extra dice in the base skill in order to take a specialization in that skill, but when you give your character specializations in that manner, they are treated as separate skills. If you give your character specializations in base skills he already has, those specializations are considered bonuses to the base skill when attempting tasks of that type.

Once you've chosen at least one specialization and put one or two pips or dice in it, you have to use the remaining specialization dice and pips to either purchase more pips in the same specialization or purchase one or more pips in other specializations.

You roll the specialization's die code only when you use the specific item or knowledge reflected by the specialization. Otherwise, you roll the base skill (or attribute if you didn't put additional dice in the full skill).

Example: If your character's Intellect is 2D+2 and her speaking is 3D, you could give her a speaking specialization of Elvish of +1 (which means that, when she's trying to speak with Elves, you roll three dice and adds 1 to the total). You would then have two specialization dice and two specialization pips to place among other specializations. With these, you could further improve her speaking: Elvish specialization, or you could pick one or more other specializations in the same or other base skills.

You decide that with one other specialization pip, you'll give your character cultures: Elves, but you won't take the full cultures skill for her. This allows your character to have cultures: Elves at 3D (add 1 to the die code of the base attribute, Intellect, which is 2D+2). Thus, when your character attempts to determine how best to handle Elvish relations, you roll 3D, but if she tries to figure out what's an appropriate gift for a Dwarf, you only rely on the attribute's score, which is 2D+2.

A character may not put dice in any skill associated with the Extranormal attribute unless that character already has dice in that attribute.

The maximum number of dice the character may start with in any base skill is 3D greater than the governing attribute, with no more than 3D greater than the base skill in any specialization.

You can find the list of skills and their descriptions here.

Advantages, Disadvantages, & Special Abilities

Advantages and Disadvantages are benefits or problems your character has. Some affect the character's attributes and skills, while others serve as useful roleplaying tools for rounding out the character. Special Abilities are unusual talents or powers the character has that most other Humans don't have. The next section, "Character Options," discusses these characteristics. You may ignore this section if you don't want to add them to your character.

Move

This number (usually 10) represents how many meters your character moves in a round at maximum walking speed in standard conditions. (The running skill can increase this rate.) Move also serves as the base for other movement skills.

Should the character have a different sort of movement than normal (such as fins for legs), see the Hindrance Disadvantage (described in the "Character Options" section) for information on how to account for this variability.

Special Points

Players' characters typically start the game with one Fate Point and five Character Points. You can spend these points to improve your character's chance of succeeding in especially difficult situations. (The mechanics of this are discussed in the "Game Basics" section.) Character Points alternatively are used to permanently improve skills. Your character earns more Character and Fate Points by having adventures. There is no limit to the number of Character or Fate Points your character may have at any time.

Body Points & Wounds

This section of the character sheet allows you to keep track of the healthiness of your character. Which you use depends on the gamemaster.

Determining Body Points

When you create a new character, roll his Physique (including any modifiers from Disadvantages or Special Abilities) and add 20. This becomes his Body Point total. Write it on the character sheet in the space provided. Templates already have their Body Points determined.

Example: Your character has 3D+1 in Physique. You roll three dice, making sure one of them is the Wild Die. The dice come up 4 and 6, with a 1 on the Wild Die. Since the 1 has no negative effect, you add the numbers to arrive at a total of 11. You then include the pip bonus of 1 with this for 12. Finally, you add 12 to 20 to get a Body Point total of 32.

Determining Wounds

If your gamemaster is using the Wound levels option with Body Points, see the appropriate table in the "Damage" section to determine the range of Body Points associated with each Wound level. If your gamemaster is only using Wounds, you don't need to figure out the Body Points range; you can put a line through that column if you'd like.

Strength Damage

Strength Damage indicates the amount of harm a character can do in combat with body parts, melee weapons, thrown weapons, and most missile weapons.

Determining Strength Damage

To determine the Strength Damage die code, take the character's Physique or lifting (including any die code modifiers from Disadvantages or Special Abilities) and drop the pips. Divide by 2, and round up.

Example: A character with 3D in Physique has a Strength Damage of 2D. A character with 6D+2 in lifting has a Strength Damage of 3D.

Templates & Strength Damage

If you added dice to a template's lifting skill, you'll need to adjust the Strength Damage value listed. Use the information above to correct the number.

Funds

To allow the gamemaster to more easily adjust the "real world" cost to something appropriate for her world or her part of the world, this system substitutes difficulties for the prices of items. Each character thus gets a Funds attribute, which represents the amount of money the character can get without too much trouble on a regular basis because of work or investments.

All characters start with a base of 3 in Funds. Use the accompanying table to adjust this number. Include any modifiers to attributes due to Disadvantages or Special Abilities. The minimum total is 1. The final total becomes the die code in the Funds attribute.

After character creation, a player can increase the Funds attribute by spending Character Points (using the rules in the "Improving Characters" chapter) or through bonuses received as adventure rewards.

If the gamemaster prefers to use cash or its equivalent, multiply the Funds total by a value specified by the gamemaster (typically about 60 silver, but gamemasters may increase or decrease this depending on how expensive goods and services are in their setting). This is how much money the character receives per week for whatever sort of work the character does or investments the character has.

Example: Your character has 4D in Intellect, 6D in trading, and +2D in a specialization of trading: currency exchange. Starting with 3, you add to it 1 for your high Intellect score and 1 for having at least 8D in trading plus a specialization. Your final total is 5, which gives you a Funds score of 5D. If your gamemaster preferred cash, you would start with a regular income of 300 silver per week.

Using the Funds attribute is discussed in the "Equipment" chapter.

Equipment

A player of a starting character may select one small weapon and a little protective gear plus a few tools of the character's chosen trade, unless there is equipment already listed on the template sheet. Some basic equipment is explained in the "Equipment" section; the gamemaster may allow other options.

Character Features & Other Details

The character sheet provided in this book and most other templates include spots for your character's name, career, species, gender, age, and background information. Unless specified by the template or your gamemaster allows otherwise, your character's species is Human. See the "Non-Human Races" section for details on alternate racial packages. Everything else in these sections you are free to fill in as you like.

Height & Weight

Players who want their characters significantly larger or smaller than the average Human have a few options. If the size is proportionately larger or smaller, then the character must have the Size Advantage. If the size is a hindrance, then the character should have the Hindrance Disadvantage as well. Otherwise, fill in the height and weight on the character sheet however you'd like, within average Human limits.

OpenD6 Fantasy Character Creation

To make a character, you'll need to select a template from within these rules or another OpenD6 System game, or make your own. A blank character sheet also is included in these rules. You can either print your chosen sheet, or copy the information onto a separate piece of paper. You also can find the templates available free at the OpenD6 Fantasy website, www.opend6fantasy.com.

Templates

A few starting templates have been provided in these rules. To get started right away, pick one and distribute seven skill dice among the skills listed; the dice for attributes have already been done for you. Although the listed skills are the ones that type of character might typically have, though you could include others not on the list if you'd like.

For skill descriptions and details on how to distribute skill dice, see the "Skills" section later in this section.

If desired, you can fill in the other character features (such as gender, age, etc.) and provide any additional notes on the character's history. There is no need to purchase equipment, as that has already been figured for the characters.

If you choose a template from another OpenD6 System game, you may need to make some adjustments in the types of skills a character based on that might have. Check the list herein to make sure the template's skills are described in this OpenD6 version. If one is not, either cross it off the template or substitute a similar skill that does exist. Also, some attributes may have different names. If you are unsure how an attribute translates to OpenD6 Fantasy, ask your gamemaster.

Once you have finished filling in your template, you can either start playing the game with your group, or you can skip to the "Game Basics" section and read more on how to use your new character.

Defined Limits

If you wish to make your own starting character from scratch, without a template but with defined limits on what can be put into attributes and skills, use these guidelines. This chapter describes each characteristic in more detail, including examples on how you can split the dice.

These guidelines assume you'll make a normal Human character. If not, talk with your gamemaster about the minimums, maximums, and other requirements for the character race you want to use. Peruse the "Non-Human Races" chapter for some sample ideas.

See the various sections in this chapter for details on dice distribution and figuring out other aspects of your character.

Attributes: Distribute 18 dice among the seven attributes. The minimum is 1D and the maximum is 5D in all attributes except Extranormal attributes, which remains at 0D for most characters.

Skills: Distribute seven dice among the skills. The maximum number of dice added to any one skill is 3D.

Move: This equals 10 meters per round.

Body Points: If your gamemaster is using this characteristic, roll your character's Physique and add 20 to the total. Ignore this characteristic if your gamemaster is only using Wounds.

Wounds: If your gamemaster is using the Wound levels option with Body Points, see the appropriate table in the "Damage and Body Points" section of the "Damage" chapter to determine the range of Body Points associated with each Wound level. If your gamemaster only will use Wounds, you don't need to figure out the Body Points range; you can put a line through that column if you'd like.

Strength Damage: Drop the pips from your character's Physique or lifting score (including any Special Abilities or Disadvantages that affect the die code), divide the number by 2, and round up. This is the Strength Damage die code.

Funds and Silver: Funds and Silver reveal how much wealth your character can usually get at without too much trouble. All characters start with a base Funds die code of 3D. Check "Funds" in this chapter for modifiers to this roll and how to convert this number to coins. The cash equivalent of Funds goes on the Silver line.

Character Points: Characters start with five Character Points.

Fate Points: Characters start with one Fate Point.

For equipment, Advantages, Disadvantages, Special Abilities, background, and character features, see the appropriate sections in this chapter for more details on how to fill out these optional sections.

Creation Point Pool

Those who wish to use points to create their characters, rather than following a template or being restricted in what they can put in skills and attributes, can use a point system. Each novice character receives 79 creation points to distribute among all the options. Players may only spend creation points as whole points, not as fractions.

  • One attribute die equals four creation points.
  • One skill die equals one creation point.
  • Three skill specialization dice equal one creation point.
  • Advantages and Special Abilities have their own costs associated with them; see the "Character Options" chapter for details.

Other restrictions apply:

  • Attributes have a minimum of 1D and a maximum of 5D, except in Extranormal attributes.
  • The maximum starting number of dice that may be added to any one skill or specialization of skill is 3D.
  • Points must be spent on whole dice, though the purchased dice may be split and distributed in their category. For instance, if a player spends four creation points to get one attribute die, the die may be split into three pips and divided among up to three attributes, but no attribute pip may be traded in for a skill die.

Players of Human characters may add up to 10 additional creation points to their totals by taking an appropriate number of ranks in Disadvantages. Non-Human species may have their own creation point totals, maximum number of points from Disadvantages, and starting Advantages, Disadvantages, and Special Abilities.

For worlds involving more Special Abilities, gamemasters should feel free to raise the number of starting creation points and the number of possible creation points received from Disadvantages.

Characters also receive the following aspects, like those created with defined limits:

Move: This equals 10 meters per round.

Body Points: If your gamemaster includes this characteristic, roll your character's Physique and add 20 to the total. Ignore this characteristic if your gamemaster is using Wounds only.

Wounds: If your gamemaster relies on the Wound levels option with Body Points, see the appropriate table in the "Damage and Body Points" section of the "Damage" chapter to determine the range of Body Points associated with each Wound level. If your gamemaster uses Wounds only, you don't need to figure out the Body Points range; you can put a line through that column if you'd like.

Strength Damage: Drop the pips from your character's Physique or lifting score (including any Special Abilities or Disadvantages that affect the die code), divide the number by 2, and round up. This is the Strength Damage die code.

Funds and Silver: Funds and silver measure how much wealth your character can usually get at without too much trouble. All characters start with a base Funds die code of 3D. Look under "Funds" in this chapter for modifiers to this roll and how to convert this number to cash. The cash equivalent of Funds goes on the Silver line.